From Local Farms to Your Fingers

Who doesn’t love a charcuterie board?

Cured meats and exotic cheeses paired with fruits, nuts, dips, and spreads . . . all displayed in a festive array.

Makes your mouth water just thinking about it, doesn’t it?

Alexis Saghie certainly thinks so. So much, in fact, that she built a business out of it.

It all started one random evening when she and her sisters created a charcuterie board for her family. “I was inspired by my love of food,” she says, “so I decided to create an Instagram account to see what would happen.”

The business took off overnight. Alexis began by creating charcuterie boxes and dropping them off at people’s homes. By December of 2020, she was overwhelmed with orders. “As months continued, we got into a lot of local events and weddings.” Farm to Fingers has now been open for almost a year, and it continues to be a booming business.

Alexis has been in contact with Mary at the SBDC from the get-go. “I had a lot of questions because I’ve never started a business. I wanted to create something that was stable.”

The SBDC helped her gain a basic understanding about the fundamentals—everything from licensing to tax information to creating a profitable business plan.

Alexis says, “They’ve been a great resource to help me learn the basics. I’m very self-taught, so I was able to do a lot of research on their website and figure out exactly what to do. I’ve also appreciated the availability of the staff to answer questions. My experience with SBDC was really positive during the initial formative months.”

Everything you order from Farm to Fingers is farm and locally oriented. (Hence, the name! The food goes from the farm to your fingers!). They have a lot of local products, including jams and jellies from Honeyville, cheeses from James Ranch, and breads from Bread. “We are trying to branch out and find local farms to diversify our boxes and to include more local, sustainable products.”

When you order from Farm to Fingers, you’ll have a variety of different menu options. The Mezze option is Alexis’s favorite because it celebrates her Lebanese heritage. “I have a love for food and a love for my past. It’s who I am,” she says.

Alexis loves running the business, but it has its challenges too. “It’s so fun and awesome to meet people in the community and form relationships, but you always have to be on your toes. You need to keep up with social media, newsletters, etc. You have to be open to feedback, especially in a small community. There’s a lot of learning going on behind the scenes. You have to be willing to ask questions and figure out what you need to know!”

Which brings everything back to the SBDC. Alexis has appreciated being able to ask about anything and receive quick responses. “When they don’t have an answer, they are always able to direct me to someone who might.”

So, if you are thinking about starting your own business, Alexis would tell you to just go for it. “It gives you such a freedom to create what you want to create and brings the meaning and purpose you want in your life because you are building something from your heart—especially in small towns and communities. People love it and are willing to hold your hand. It might seem daunting, but everyone has it in them to create something.”

Bountiful Ridge Farms

Rick Goodall is a second-generation farmer in Arriola, CO, whose family grew apples and raised livestock. He married Gerrie twenty-two years ago. That’s when Gerrie was first introduced to farming. While expecting their second child, Gerrie chose to stay at home to raise the children, but the tradeoff was the loss of a second income. Gerrie considered her options and decided to plant a garden. Her first harvest was plentiful, yet it yielded a tremendous

Read More »
Out West Saddlery

By Malia Durbano Out West Saddlery owner Terri Beecher knew advisor Rich Lindblad since they both live in Pagosa. She contacted him for some advice.While most businesses contact the SBDC for help with getting started or growing, Terri had a different problem. After several visits, Rich concluded that the business had great potential for growth. However, Terri explained what a hard time they had finding good help. She and her husband had built a wonderful,

Read More »
Studio B: A Place to “B”

Coworking, or flexspace, is all the rage in the era of remote work. After all, what better way to build professional relationships than by sharing a workspace? But, what if there was a flexspace designed specifically for coaches and therapists? And, what if that coworking space had a full team who could provide mental and physical health services? To make it even better, what if it had a full time administrative assistant who managed all

Read More »
MUNIRevs

by Malia Durbano As the Finance Director for Mountain Village in Telluride, Erin Neer saw gaps in the government accounting system that she thought she could fix. “Technology in government systems hasn’t evolved as quickly as it had in the private sector,” she deduced. Neer believed she could provide these services best from the vantage point of an entrepreneur, so she started her own business, headquartered in Dolores, CO. As the previous owner of Anytime

Read More »
Watikuh Assistive Technology

‘Watikuh’ is a Hopi word which means to run for it.  The word is also found in the name of Kayla Hefner’s business, Watikuh Assistive Technology Services (WATS).  Kayla stated, “starting a new business is any environment is tough.  But starting a business in physical, emotional and mental chaos, and having a vision at the same time is overwhelming.”  What did Kayla do?  She went for it. For seventeen years, Kayla was a partner and

Read More »
Create Art & Tea

What happens when an entrepreneur envisions a grass roots movement centered around tea and art?  Create Tea & Art (CT&A) of course!  Caprice Fox is building community by combining the comfort and health aspects of tea with a gathering space for local artists and their hand-crafted works.  Caprice said, “People enjoy having tea to come to with the art.  There is an enjoyment of the social aspect.  I’m still learning how to combine them.”  To

Read More »