Jitters’ Java

Jitters Java: Where Every Burrito is Made with Love

Jitters Java had been closed for more than three years.

Yet, through its shuttered doors, Aimee Beauregard saw potential.

Aimee had just experienced some monumental life changes that left her looking for purpose. The more she thought about it, the more she realized that she needed to find a way to give back to the community.

She knew Marwa and Greg, the original owners of the coffee shop. She has always loved to cook and put a smile on people’s faces, so she decided to take the plunge.

She purchased the coffee shop a year and a half ago, and on March 20, 2019, Jitters Java re-opened for business.

Aimee says, “It was hard at first. Just getting it open and letting people know that it was open again was a struggle!”

However, Aimee persisted, and the coffee shop is quickly regaining popularity as a staple of the Durango community.

Jitters Java serves local and organic coffee from Rocky Mountain Roastery, burritos, muffins, and other baked goods. “I roll and cook everything myself,” Aimee says, “I make every burrito with love.”

Aimee is passionate about making a difference and is actively working with many nonprofits in the community. She partners with Annie’s Orphans and the Humane Society to help find permanent homes for orphaned pets. Office Depot prints her wraps, and each one features an animal that is in need of a family.

Jitters Java is also a drop-off point for Act for You, a nonprofit that helps women transition out of domestic violence situations. “Many of these women have absolutely nothing,” Aimee explains, “Act for You takes donations and puts bags together to help them transition to a new life.”

The coffee shop also gives food to the homeless and hosts snow cone fundraisers for organizations like Manna Soup Kitchen. Aimee says, “We have an amazing community here. Everyone helps each other, and I love that. Anytime an organization needs help, I want to help if I can.”

In addition to sponsoring nonprofits, Aimee loves to support other local businesses. She buys local as often as possible, and she loves giving referrals. Her coffee shop is often the first stop for many tourists, and she gladly provides suggestions on what to do, where to eat, what’s happening, etc.

This fall, Aimee will add lunch wraps and grab & go soups and drinks to her menu. She is working with Pedal the Peaks to build an e-bike, so she can make downtown coffee and lunch deliveries.

Aimee was excited to learn that students from Fort Lewis College will be housed in the hotel across the street. She has reached out to the College to find ways to provide food passes for the students. She is looking forward to making a difference in these young people’s lives.

Aimee is a “one-woman show” at Jitters Java. She says, “I don’t get many days off, but it’s worth it. I’ve had so much community support that it fuels my drive.”

“Both SBDC and Region 9 have been absolutely amazing. Richard Lindblad and Brian Rose have taken me under their wings. Mary Shepherd and Hannah Birdsong have provided guidance and direction. They’ve given me the strength and resources to get through. It makes me want to cry to know that so many people believe in me. I want to flourish for them — to show them that I was a good bet.”

Like many businesses, Aimee has had to make adjustments during the pandemic. She wears a mask and encourages her customers to wear one as well. She spends 30 minutes every afternoon sanitizing and is self-certified through San Juan Basin Health. Her customers feel safe knowing that she is a one-woman operation, so their food/drinks aren’t passing through multiple hands.

When many businesses had to close in March and April, Aimee allowed them to put signs up in her window if needed. She wants Jitters Java to become an integral part of this community.

Her advice to other aspiring entrepreneurs? “Don’t give up. If you really want to do it and it means something to you, don’t give up. You can get through it. You may not see the light ahead, but in time, you will.”

Despite all of the hard work, Aimee absolutely LOVES her job. She says, “I’ve had zero dollar days and $50 days. I believe in it, and I want to make it something that will be here. I’m not going to let it die.”

Hard work breeds success, and Jitters Java is going to be one of Durango’s Best.

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